Destinations

Wat Sisaket in Vientiane

1, Overview Wat Sisaket located in Vientiane is famous for its cloister wall housing thousands of tiny Buddha images...

Himeji Castle

Overview Unlike many other Japanese castles, Himeji Castle was never destroyed in wars, earthquakes or fires and survives in...

Hon Tam – “Green Island” in Nha Trang Bay

Hon Tam is considered as the “green island” within Nha Trang, so what first attracted tourists to Hon Tam...

Six amazing fields in Northern Vietnam

Bridge introduces the six fields that have become tourist attractions in the northern region of Vietnam. >>More “A European”...

“A European” on the top of Ba Na Hills

If you have not yet go to Europe to enjoy the splendor of ancient castles, romantic scene beside Seine...

Travel Tips

Top 3 things to do in Japan

When you have a chance to come Japan, which places you will visit and what thing will you do....

Bangkok, Thailand, Travel Tips

Getting to Bangkok Many major airlines fly to Bangkok, but Thai Airways provides an authentic Thai experience. The flight...

Laos Travel Guide

First and foremost, despite the challenges you may have heard or read about the region, we are here to...

5 Tips to Ride a Tuk-Tuk in Bangkok

Tuk-tuk or ‘sam lor’ (three-wheeled) used to be everyone’s favourite way of getting around Bangkok before the BTS, MRT and colourful...

Travel Tips for Seoul, South Korea

South Korea ‘s capital city, Seoul, is a city where green parks, mountains and ancient temples break up the concrete...

How to Greet People in Japan

If you are traveling to Japan, knowing how to bow and greet in Japan can be helpful. Bowing (ojigi) is an important custom in Japan. People commonly greet each other by bowing instead of handshaking, and people generally have a small conversation after or before they bow.

>>  Asia customs

>> 10 Things to Know Before You Go to Japan

Step 1:Learn to bow

This custom is used constantly in Japan.

This custom is used constantly in Japan.

This custom is used constantly in Japan. You may even see people bowing while on the phone. Keep in mind that men and women bow differently—men usually keep their hands at their sides, while women put their hands together on their thighs with their fingers touching.

  • 15 degree bow. This is the most informal bow. It is used for casual greetings, such as if you are rushing to work and see someone you know, or if you run into a friend on the streets. (Remember, no matter how informal it may be, it is incredibly impolite not to return a bow if someone bows to you).
  • 30 degree bow. The most common type of bow is done to a 30-degree angle to greet customers or to thank someone. It’s often seen in Japanese business situations, and is not used for formal events. It equates to welcoming a customer to your shop or inviting a friend to come into your home.
  • 45 degree bow. This is the most formal type of bow. It signifies deep gratitude, a respectful greeting, a formal apology, asking for favors, and so on.

Step 2: Learn the verbal greetings

 A conversation/greeting will generally start will "konnichiwa" or "hello."

A conversation/greeting will generally start will “konnichiwa” or “hello.”

A conversation/greeting will generally start will “konnichiwa” or “hello.” In the evening, you would say, “konbanwa” meaning “Good evening,” and in the morning you would usually say, “ohayō gozaimasu,” meaning “good morning,” although you can simply say “ohayō,” if talking to someone you are closer to like a friend or family member.

  • If you are having an informal conversation it is polite to follow your greeting with a question such as “Ogenki desu ka?” (“Are you well?”). If you are asked this question and your health is good reply with, “Hai, genki desu.” (“Yes I am well.”). If you are in poor health, you can say “Guai ga warui desu.” (“I am feeling ill.”).

Step 3: Be aware of the proper titles for each person

Be aware of the proper titles for each person

Be aware of the proper titles for each person

Unlike in English, the title follows the name of the person (the person’s last name except with very close friends).

  • The most common title to add to a name is “San,” which can be roughly translated to “Mr.”, “Miss”, “Mrs.”, or “Ms.” Example: Suzuki-san. To address your senior colleagues in a school, company, sports club, or other group, use, “senpai”. Example: Ogawa-senpai. End a teacher’s name or the name of anyone you would address as “Dr.” in English with “sensei.” Example: Iwai-sensei
  • When you are the authority: A younger girl or close girl friend’s name can be ended with, “-chan” and younger boys’ names can be ended with, “kun.” “Kōhai,” is the junior reverse to senpai, but it is not used to address people. Depending on the person a senpai may use “san” or “kun” with a kōhai’s name, or they may just use their last name with no suffix (which would be rude in other contexts, but is alright here). Another suffix, “-sama”, is only used in very formal situations, like addressing a letter or talking to a customer where you work.


Related articles


Top 3 things to do in Japan

When you have a chance to come Japan, which places you will visit and what thing will you do. The following list is Top 3 things to do in Japan....

Bangkok, Thailand, Travel Tips

Getting to Bangkok Many major airlines fly to Bangkok, but Thai Airways provides an authentic Thai experience. The flight attendants are garbed in traditional Thai dress, and Thai flowers...

10 Things to Know Before You Go to Japan

Beautiful, mysterious, and so very far away— Japan ‘s appeal for the traveler is eternal. But there’s a lot to know about this enigmatic country before you set foot within...

7 Things You Must Know before Traveling to Korea

Tips for first-time travelers planning to visit South Korea soon. >> Asia customs >> Vietnamese Engagement Ceremony 1, Incheon is the gateway to South Korea Are you planning on going to...

Vietnamese Engagement Ceremony

Vietnamese engagement ceremony is an important ceremony before the wedding which involve both fiancé’s and fiancée’s families. In the past, engagement ceremony was considered very important even than the wedding...

Loading